Hedges

Have you ever thought about growing an edible hedge instead of a fence?  We have just planted one about 50 metres long, with the plants spaced at about a metre apart, with a watering line with drippers running the whole length. Hopefully the hedge won’t need watering when it is well established. I did a bit of research on suitable plants. Obviously you want hardy plants, evergreen, that can be pruned hard but still remain leafy and thick. Below are some ideas for suitable plants. As well as these, we have used Acerola, Lemon, Kei Apple, Grumichamas, Icecream Bean and Lillypillies.

Sandberry  (Austromyrtus dulcis)

A low shrub to 50cm high with 80cm spread.  Leaves develop reddish shade which is apparent in new growth.  Flowers are white, similar to tea tree flowers.  Mauve edible fruits.

Natal Plum (Carissa grandiflora)

A fast growing dense shrub reaching a height of 3m x 4.5 metres.  The small, rounded leaves have sharp spines among them.  White flowers appear from spring to summer.  The edible fruit that follows is red, fleshy and oval.

Coffee (Coffea arabica)

A commercial coffee tree.  Very attractive evergreen shrub for frost-free gardens.  Can reach 4.5m tall.  Small fragrant white flowers.  Dark red fruits that contain 2 ‘beans’ which when extracted are dried and roasted into coffee.

Jaboticaba  (Myrciara cauliflora)

An attractive ornamental fruiting tree.  The fruit is borne directly on the trunk, is blue-black and possesses a thin, touch skin.  Very sweet and slightly aromatic translucent pulp.

Magenta Cherry  (Syzygium paniculata select)

Small to medium tree with a rounded crown.  Densely foliaged.  Leaves are shiny green.  Coppery brown when young.  Fragrant creamy white flowers held in dense clusters mainly in late spring.  Decorative fruits are rose purple, oval and up to 25mm long.

Tea (Camellia sinensis)

A shrub to 3m tall with thin, serrated leaves.  Insignificant white to cream flowers.

Authored by: 
Jenny Awbery
Sourced from: 
RFC Brisbane Branch newsletter Oct Nov 2001
Date sourced: 
Oct 2001